Detroit Tigers: Eyebrow-Raising Transactions #10-1

kris10bentley
Jul 26, 2015; Cooperstown, NY, USA; Hall of Fame Inductee John Smoltz puts on a wig to combat all the comments about how he has no hair during his acceptance speech during the Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies at Clark Sports Center. Mandatory Credit: Gregory J. Fisher-USA TODAY Sports
Jul 26, 2015; Cooperstown, NY, USA; Hall of Fame Inductee John Smoltz puts on a wig to combat all the comments about how he has no hair during his acceptance speech during the Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies at Clark Sports Center. Mandatory Credit: Gregory J. Fisher-USA TODAY Sports /
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Aug 7, 2015; Detroit, MI, USA; Baseball on the pitchers mound before the game between the Detroit Tigers and the Boston Red Sox at Comerica Park. Mandatory Credit: Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 7, 2015; Detroit, MI, USA; Baseball on the pitchers mound before the game between the Detroit Tigers and the Boston Red Sox at Comerica Park. Mandatory Credit: Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports /

10. Alex Sanchez

Sanchez was an unhappy player who seemed to doom his own fate in professional baseball. He was drafted by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, taken off of waivers by the Milwaukee Brewers, and eventually signed by the Detroit Tigers in 2003. During Spring Training in 2005, the Tigers released him only for Tampa Bay to pick him back up.

This brief summary of his time in the MLB seems innocuous; however, it was anything but. He was the first player to be suspended by the MLB policy for abusing performance enhancing drugs. He lost over $30,000 in the process.

Along with troubles with the drug policy, Sanchez had issues with his performance and attitude. Despite being found guilty of using PEDs, he hit only 4 home runs in over 1300 at-bats. His attitude in the clubhouses in Milwaukee and Tampa Bay were major reasons why he was traded. In 2003, with the Tigers, he led the league in caught stealing, which of course helped the Tigers achieve the horrible record during that year.

The only good thing is that the Tigers did not pay him much.

Next: Smart Managing for a Weak Batter

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