Detroit Tigers News

Detroit Tigers: Eyebrow-Raising Transactions #10-1

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Jul 26, 2015; Cooperstown, NY, USA; Hall of Fame Inductee John Smoltz puts on a wig to combat all the comments about how he has no hair during his acceptance speech during the Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies at Clark Sports Center. Mandatory Credit: Gregory J. Fisher-USA TODAY Sports
Jul 26, 2015; Cooperstown, NY, USA; Hall of Fame Inductee John Smoltz puts on a wig to combat all the comments about how he has no hair during his acceptance speech during the Hall of Fame Induction Ceremonies at Clark Sports Center. Mandatory Credit: Gregory J. Fisher-USA TODAY Sports /
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Sep 18, 2015; Detroit, MI, USA; General view of the right field lights that went out prior to the game between the Detroit Tigers and the Kansas City Royals at Comerica Park. Mandatory Credit: Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 18, 2015; Detroit, MI, USA; General view of the right field lights that went out prior to the game between the Detroit Tigers and the Kansas City Royals at Comerica Park. Mandatory Credit: Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports /

9. Ray Oyler

Despite the fact that Oyler was a part of the legendary 1968 World Series team, he was one of the weakest links. He could field the shortstop position with ease, but his bat was practically non-existent. He only played for five seasons and ended his short career batting .175/.258/.508. Of course, 1968 was known as the year of the pitcher, but there were plenty of players who could hit above .200 on a regular basis.

Oyler was a key piece in the legendary move by Mayo Smith. To get the newly healed Al Kaline back in at right field, Smith had to move Oyler out of the lineup. He put Mickey Stanley (the regular center fielder) at short and placed Jim Northrup at center. This move is credited as one of the best baseball managing moves in history and it had to be made because the Tigers signed such a useless offensive player.

In the following year, Oyler left the Tigers and played with the newly opened Seattle Pilots franchise. He finished his career in 1970 with the California Angels where he only made 24 plate appearances.

Next: He Didn't Live Up to His Future-Hall-of-Famer Reputation

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