Detroit Tigers: Arbitration-eligible players as trade candidates

DETROIT, MI - AUGUST 23: Jose Iglesias #1 of the Detroit Tigers celebrates a ninth inning home run with Alex Presley #14 while playing New York Yankees at Comerica Park on August 23, 2017 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
DETROIT, MI - AUGUST 23: Jose Iglesias #1 of the Detroit Tigers celebrates a ninth inning home run with Alex Presley #14 while playing New York Yankees at Comerica Park on August 23, 2017 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images) /
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DETROIT, MI – SEPTEMBER 3: Shortstop Jose Iglesias #1 of the Detroit Tigers turns the ball after getting a force out on Greg Allen #53 of the Cleveland Indians during the second inning at Comerica Park on September 3, 2017 in Detroit, Michigan. Francisco Lindor of the Cleveland Indians hit into the play but beat the throw to first base. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images) /

Money

With so much money having been removed from the books in the past season, there isn’t as much of a need to shed salary.

That being said, jettisoning some arbitration eligible players who aren’t part of the long-term picture could help trim the payroll even further.

The most conceivable trade candidates, part one

Jose Iglesias

Most prominent among the potential trade candidates is Jose Iglesias.

In another situation, the slick-fielding shortstop would have been a lock to stay in Detroit.

That being said, he’s 27 and has just one year of controllability left (per Spotrac) before becoming a free agent. With a rising price tag and a ready-made replacement in Dixon Machado, a trade seems prudent.

By comparison, Machado is 25 and is controllable through the 2022 season according to the folks at Spotrac.

Per the same publication, the younger shortstop isn’t even eligible for arbitration until after the 2019 campaign.

Shane Greene

Perhaps the most important of the group to the team in terms of overall value, an in-depth breakdown of potential Greene trade partners can be found here.

However, due to Greene’s remaining years of team control, he isn’t a lock to be traded.

That controllability (per Spotrac, the reliever won’t hit free agency until after 2020) could boost the closer’s trade value, but it could also mean him being a part of the next great Detroit Tigers team.

This one could probably go either way.