Detroit Tigers: Free agent shortstop depth options if Jose Iglesias is traded

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - APRIL 19: Shortstop Jose Iglesias #1 of the Detroit Tigers throws to first base to turn a double play over Steven Souza Jr. #20 of the Tampa Bay Rays to end the first inning of a game on April 19, 2017 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
ST. PETERSBURG, FL - APRIL 19: Shortstop Jose Iglesias #1 of the Detroit Tigers throws to first base to turn a double play over Steven Souza Jr. #20 of the Tampa Bay Rays to end the first inning of a game on April 19, 2017 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images) /
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WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 10: J.J. Hardy #2 of the Baltimore Orioles makes a throw to first base for the first out of the third inning to force out Trea Turner #7 of the Washington Nationals (not pictured) during the third inning at Nationals Park on May 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt Hazlett/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 10: J.J. Hardy #2 of the Baltimore Orioles makes a throw to first base for the first out of the third inning to force out Trea Turner #7 of the Washington Nationals (not pictured) during the third inning at Nationals Park on May 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt Hazlett/Getty Images) /

J.J. Hardy

It remains to be seen if Hardy will become a free agent this winter.

According to Spotrac, the 35-year-old Baltimore shortstop has a $14 million club option on his contract for 2018 with a $2 million buyout.

Should Hardy reach the free agent market, he’d be an intriguing fit as a bench piece on a short-term deal for the Detroit Tigers.

No longer the double-digit home run threat he was in his earlier years with the Brewers and Orioles, the veteran can still provide some pop.

Hardy averaged 21 doubles and eight home runs over the last four seasons, turning in respective ISO numbers of .106, .138, .092 and .104.

The shortstop can still provide value in the field as well.

Prior to an injury-shortened 2017, Hardy had rattled off three seasons with a UZR/150 north of 10.0 and a DRS of at least +4.

In fact, +4 was the shortstop’s lowest DRS output since 2014 as he went for a +10 number and a +6 stat in 2014 and 2015 respectively.

Stephen Drew

A key bench cog for the Washington Nationals the last two seasons, Drew wasn’t nearly as productive at the plate in 2017 (106 plate appearances, 70 wRC+, .285 wOBA, .302 on-base percentage and a .105 ISO) as he was in 2016 (165 plate appearances, 124 wRC+, .362 wOBA, .339 on-base percentage and a .259 ISO).

Still, he has enough offensive ability to be a utility player in Detroit.

Drew has significant experience at all three infield positions not called first base. He could be a useful bench piece and a potential trade chip if he can replicate his 2016 statline.