Detroit Tigers Represented on 2018 Hall of Fame Ballot

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OAKLAND, CA - MAY 27: Dixon Machado #49 of the Detroit Tigers is congratulated by first base coach Omar Vizquel #15 after hitting a single for his first Major League hit during the sixth inning against the Oakland Athletics at O.co Coliseum on May 27, 2015 in Oakland, California. The Detroit Tigers defeated the Oakland Athletics 3-2.(Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - MAY 27: Dixon Machado #49 of the Detroit Tigers is congratulated by first base coach Omar Vizquel #15 after hitting a single for his first Major League hit during the sixth inning against the Oakland Athletics at O.co Coliseum on May 27, 2015 in Oakland, California. The Detroit Tigers defeated the Oakland Athletics 3-2.(Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images) /
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Detroit Tigers
ANAHEIM, CA – AUGUST 25: Miguel Cabrera #24 of the Detroit Tigers celebrates his solo homerun with Aubrey Huff #19 to tie the game 3-3 during the fifth inning at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on August 25, 2009 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images) /

Aubrey Huff

Every year, players are chosen for the Hall of Fame ballot simply because they played ten or more seasons in Major League Baseball. These players rarely get a vote for the Hall of Fame, but they get their name briefly back in the spotlight as their career is acknowledged.

Aubrey Huff is one of those players.

According to Baseball Reference, in his 13-year career Huff won one Silver Slugger Award and finished top-10 in MVP voting once.

He was never an All-Star, never led the league in any offensive category and falls considerably short of what a traditional Hall of Fame first baseman’s career looks like.

Huff broke into the bigs with Tampa Bay in 2000 and spent seven years with them before a brief stint in Houston with the Astros. From there he spent a few years with the Orioles before being traded in August of 2009 to the Tigers for minor leaguer Brett Jacobson.

Huff hit .189 with two home runs in 106 at-bats with the Tigers before signing with the San Francisco Giants, where he retired in 2012 after winning his second World Series ring.

Huff finished with 242 home runs and a 20.2 bWAR and might not come anywhere close to reaching the 5% threshold necessary to remain on the ballot.

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